Definition Arguement – tpaz1

Too many states in the U.S execute their own citizens. Although judges and courts believe putting an inmate on death row to justify their criminal act, it is an unethical resolution that is unnecessary to be performed. To clearly define the death penalty, it is a form of legalized unusual punishment. States today want to murder their own people by injecting lethal/harmful drugs in the body, electrocution, and death from a firing squad. States pay millions of dollars to perform only one execution. Legal executions are wasting money from the state, let alone the citizens who are tax payers. It costs more to kill someone rather than allowing to let them live.

The criminal justice system in the U.S is suppose to deter crime, rehabilitate convicts, and incapacitate dangerous criminals. By giving life in prison, opposing to eliminating their; serves a better way to follow the justice system’s functions. According to Sean McElwee, life imprisonment is certainly deterrent, and allows rehabilitation, where as death is final. The death penalty ultimately doesn’t serve the purpose of the criminal justice system. The death penalty is institutionalized, emotional closure, cost effective, and also reflects on racism. The justice systems wants to end violent criminals, most importantly trying to stop  violence in general, when they are promoting violence themselves. Gunning down a criminal or electrocuting an individual is violent itself.

Works Cited:

McElwee, Sean. “It’s Time to Abolish the Death Penalty.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 7 Sept. 2013. Web. 27 Oct. 2015.

Hayworth, Michael. “5 Reasons Some People Think the World Needs the Death Penalty.” Amnesty Australia. N.p., 8 July 2013. Web. 27 Oct. 2015.

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