White Paper – tpaz1

Practice Opening 1:

The death penalty is practiced and performed in many states today, in 2015. States such as, Georgia, Texas, Utah and 28 other states allow legal executions. A good percentage of criminals, who are sentenced result into being executed, but States that allow the death penalty should realize other alternatives, leading it to be fully abolished. The death penalty deserves to be abolished because it takes away human rights, too expensive to tax payers, and time consuming to prevent people from committing murder or other related crimes.

Practice Opening 2:

Many states today believe and perform legal executions to dangerous criminals. People today, don’t realize the cost and effect of the death penalty being performed. There are currently 31 states that allow the death penalty to be legal, leaving only 19 other states to be illegal. States that perform legal executions are to supposedly “prevent” less violent crimes, but no studies today, have proven that claim. There are many flaws in reasoning with legal executions, it goes against human rights, religions, tax payers, and court’s jurisdiction. The death penalty goes against many negative factors, leaving it to not be possibly administered fairly and must be abolished.

Content Descriptions:

  • The Innocent executions
  • Cost to tax-payers
  • Pope Francis’s Stand

The Innocent: 

There are many cases were innocent people are convicted of crimes they didn’t commit, when a case is brought to a re-trial of people who were later found to be innocent have actually been put to death. 4.1 percent or one in 25 has became the error rate of wrongful executions. For an example, Cameron Willingham was convicted of murder in 1992. In 2001, he was put to death, months later Forensic Science Commission later found evidence was misinterpret and evidence used against him was invalid.

Execution’s Cost: 

Court cases that don’t result into cost roughly around $740,000, while cases that do result into the use of the death penalty cost around $1.26 million. It costs more to execute a person rather than keeping him or her in prison for life. The maintaining of a death row prisoner would cost tax payers $90,000 or more per year than a prisoner in general population. The highest cost of the death penalty was in the state of California. California has totaled over $4 billion since 1978.

Pope Francis’s Stand:

As Pope Francis took his visit to the U.S, he strongly stated to the congress that the death penalty should be abolished. “I Am convinced that this way is the best, since every life is sacred, every human and person is endowed with an inalenable dignity, and society can only benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes.” The Pope expresses the responsibility to protect and defend human life. Many hope Pope Francis’s words influenced officials and people of the country to recognize the wrongs of legal executions.

Working Hypothesis: 

1: The death penalty deserves to be abolished because it takes away human rights, too expensive to tax payers, and time consuming to prevent people from committing murder or other related crimes.

2: The death penalty goes against many negative factors, leaving it to not be possibly administered fairly and must be abolished.

Topics For Smaller Papers:

  • Why the Death Penalty became illegal in other states
  • Other Countries besides the U.S that perform executions
  • States that do allow legal executions

Current State: 

I believe the death penalty should be abolished not only in the U.S but throughout the entire world. Researching this particular topic has made myself realize the importance of human life and rights, no matter what a person has done. I’m still in the process of finding more supportive reasons and evidence of opposing legal executions. I’m also still working on my thesis statement because I think it needs some work on the wording of it.

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